Asian

September 29, 2014

Simple Kimchi

I'm a HUGE Kimchi fan. Be it baechu kimchi, kkakdugi, yeolmu kimchi, etc, I simply got to have it almost everyday. Looking at the amount of $$ I'm spending on kimchi, it makes economical sense for me to make it myself, right? After testing a few recipes, I found this to be the most easy-to-make and yummilicious version. The secret step here is making the flour paste. This step is optional but my Korean friend's mom told me it will bind the spices and absorbs better into the cabbage. Adjust the level of spiciness according to your taste bud.
September 26, 2014

Buta Kimchi (Japanese pork with kimchi)

So I did a post on Buta Don a couple of days ago. Since we are on the Buta topic, I thought I might just feature this recipe, for those who like some heat in their food.
September 22, 2014

Buta Don (Pork Bowl Rice)

I've always been a fan of Yoshinoya's beef bowl. To be honest, I prefer the ones they serve in Japan. For those who does not know what is Yoshinoya, it is a fast-serving Japanese Beef Bowl restaurant found wildly in Japan and the restaurant franchise has gone internationally in Southeast Asia. But instead of beef, I'm going to share another version using pork. Buta Don is a Japanese dish consisting of a bowl of rice topped with pork simmered in a mildly sweet sauce. It also often includes onions and a sprinkling of green peas. Buta means "pig" or "pork", and don is short for donburi, the Japanese word for "bowl". The original version uses sliced fatty pork but I'm using pork collar used for shabu shabu.
September 19, 2014

Olive Vegetable Fried Rice

What is olive vegetable? I checked with Wikipedia and sadly, he does not have a definition for it. I remember mom laying out this bottle of black stuff on the table whenever we were having congee and eating it as an accompaniment. That was my acknowledge about it. Fast forward 20 years, I reunited with OV when I was having this wonderful plate of stir-fried french beans with minced meat. The aroma coming from that dish was absolutely heavenly. Don't let the name fool you. It is not made from olive leaves. Rather, it is made with a combination of olives, mustard green leaves, oil and salt marinated for a long time. They are available in any supermarket here and if you are in overseas, any Chinese grocer.
September 12, 2014

Asian Rice Salad

As a cereal grain, Rice is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia. As an Asian, we grew up eating rice. According to the Rice Association, there are more than 40,000 varieties of cultivated rice said to exist. They range from basmati to lemont and to arborio, from koshihikari to jasmine. In this recipe, I'm using Japanese rice (no, not from Fukushima). Feel free to use any other type of rice you fancy.
September 8, 2014

Baked Miso Marinated Cod

Cod vs Chilean Seabass. Many would wonder what is the difference? Is the cod I'm eating really cod? Well, I've consulted with Google and found out most of the 'cod' sold locally (Singapore) are actually Chilean Sea bass or Patagonian Toothfish. The taste and texture between these two are very similar - mild flavor and dense flaky white flesh. It is wonderfully buttery when cooked. Therefore, one could be easily mistaken for the other. In any case, this is yet another tiger's favorite Sunday night dinner request. Here is the BNF version of the classic Nobu Black Cod with Miso.
August 13, 2014

Stir-fry Asian Chicken with Caramelized Peppers

Hands down this is my family's favorite chicken dish! Or so I was told. It is so versatile, you can serve it warm or cold! Chicken is a staple protein in our household. Papa bear needs it for his daily dietary requirement. In case you do not know, I don't like to eat chilled food. But this is one dish that tastes even better when chilled. Perfect for that blazing summery afternoon heat (actually its that warm in Singapore every day)!
August 11, 2014

Pok Pok Vietnamese Wings

This is the start of chicken week! What better way to start it off than with chicken wings?? This recipe is inspired by the famous Portland's Pok Pok Vietnamese Wings. Fish sauce is an amber-colored liquid extracted from the fermentation of fish with sea salt. It is used as a condiment in various cuisines. Fish sauce is a staple ingredient in numerous cultures in Southeast Asia and the coastal regions of East Asia, and featured heavily in Cambodian, Philippines, Thai, and Vietnamese cuisine. Today, I’m going to use it as a star ingredient for my wings. It might sounds like a fishy affair but I promise you will love it!